Tag Archives: Sermon on the Mount

  1. Do unto others as God does unto you: life in God’s Neighborhood, part 3 (Matthew 7.12) [sermon 2-10-2019]

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    February 19, 2019 by jmar198013

    Most everyone knows the so-called Golden Rule (Matt. 7.12): “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” But there’s a very important word we tend to leave out: “Therefore.” That word connects how we treat others to how our heavenly Father treats us (Matthew 7.7-11). Using God as our standard means using our imaginations, asking questions, and remembering God’s mercies toward us.

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  2. Seek first God’s Neighborhood and righteousness: life in God’s Neighborhood, part 2 (Matt. 6.33) [sermon 2-3-19]

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    February 3, 2019 by jmar198013

    The second message of three on the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5 – 7) from our series in Matthew’s Gospel, “God’s Neighborhood.” This message focused on Matt. 6.33, and what it looks like when we seek first God’s kingdom (neighborhood) and his righteousness.

  3. The salty, lit city: life in God’s Neighborhood, part 1 (Matt. 5.13-16)

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    January 28, 2019 by jmar198013

    In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus tells the church we are the salt of the earth and the light of the world. This message presents three Big Ideas about what it means to be salt and light.

  4. The magi’s star, and us (Matt. 2.1-23) [sermon 1-6-19]

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    January 9, 2019 by jmar198013

    Long ago, God placed a star to shine in the sky, to lead strangers to Christ. Now God has placed the church in the world, to shine and lead other people to Christ.

  5. Don’t lead us into temptation (Luke 11.4c) [Sermon 09-04-2016]

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    September 1, 2016 by jmar198013

    One of the passages Jesus drew upon when the devil tempted him was Deut. 6.16: “Don’t test the LORD your God the way you frustrated him at Massah.” This refers back to an event that happened in Exodus 17. The people came to a place where there was no water, and were afraid God had left them to die of thirst. They lost faith in God, and were about ready to kill Moses. Testing God means refusing to trust that our Father is good and generous and just, and at work in our lives and in his world. It means giving up on God and going our own way. If Jesus had succumbed to any of the devil’s temptations: turned the stones to bread; enforced his will through political means; or stunned people into submission with self-promoting miracles; if Jesus had done any of those things, he would have been testing God. Because that’s not the way God had made for him. God gave Jesus the way of suffering with people and serving them. Not the way of self-promotion and self-service. Jesus still had to go through the Exodus of death and resurrection. To lead us all through the Red Sea of his blood to set us free, and bring us to the home God has promised us.

  6. Bring in your kingdom (Luke 11.2c) [Sermon 08-21-2016]

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    August 18, 2016 by jmar198013

    One day God’s kingdom will come in its fullness. There will be a new heavens and a new earth. Our bodies will be raised imperishable. Death and sorrow will be no more. God will wipe every tear from every eye. We will dwell with God and God with us forever in a greened city—the new Jerusalem. Ultimately, this is what we’re praying for when we ask God to, Bring in your kingdom. In the meantime, because we pray these words, we are called to live in their light. That can mean doing things like planting gardens. Cleaning up litter. Wiping away each others’ tears, even as we cry together. Bringing healing to sick and wounded bodies. We are totally only limited by our imaginations! The point is, we bring heaven’s touch to this earth, this life, right here and now. That’s our work as disciples. That’s our work as the church. That’s God’s kingdom, working.

  7. Real talk on generosity (2 Corinthians 8.1-15) [Sermon 06-26-2016]

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    June 22, 2016 by jmar198013

    There’s a feedback loop between fellowship and generosity. That’s how the Jesus model of generosity works. And that’s what Paul hoped the Judean Poor Relief Fund would accomplish: bonding the Jewish and Gentile churches together as a family. A big, diverse, messy, rich, robust family that shows the world how generous God is.

    When we follow the Jesus model of generosity—the self-giving way, the way of sharing-as-fellowship—it changes us. It transforms our hearts, our worldview, our values. We discover that our most valuable treasures are found in each other. And, like the man said: “Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”

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