Tag Archives: John 10

  1. GOD, my shepherd (Psalm 23) [Sermon 6-23-2017]

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    June 22, 2017 by jmar198013

    The Psalms not only give us new language to speak to God with; they give us new and colorful ways to describe God, imagine God, and experience God. This leads to deeper and richer conversations with God. Psalm 23 imagines God as both a shepherd guiding us through scary places; and a host who wines and dines us in his own home. Other psalms portray God as a warrior, food and drink, and even a mother with a nursing baby at her breast. When we learn to imagine and speak to God with these metaphors, we learn God’s faithfulness to meet all our needs.

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  2. The shepherd’s voice (John 10.22-30) [Sermon 04-17-2016, Easter 4c: Good Shepherd Sunday]

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    April 17, 2016 by jmar198013

    In John 10.22-30, Jesus says that his sheep listen to his voice and follow him.

    Do they listen because they are his sheep? Or are they his sheep because they listen? Do they follow Jesus because he is their shepherd? Or is Jesus their shepherd because they follow?

  3. Sheep Without a Shepherd (Mark 6.30-34, 53-56; 2 Sam. 7.1-14; Eph. 2.11-22): Sermon 7-19-2015

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    July 19, 2015 by jmar198013

    What about these people ignited compassion in Jesus? They were like sheep without a shepherd. Now, that’s a pretty heart-wrenching image, isn’t it? We understand that this means they’re lost, directionless, vulnerable to attack by predators. What we might not understand is that, in the world of the Bible, the phrase sheep without a shepherd is loaded with significance. It is a politically-charged phrase, an indictment of failed leadership.

    In fact, one of the most bitter judgments in Scripture about corrupt leadership trades exclusively in the metaphor of bad shepherds. Ezekiel 34.2ff says: “Doom to Israel’s shepherds who tended themselves! You drink the milk, you wear the wool, and you slaughter the fat animals, but you don’t tend the flock. You don’t strengthen the weak, heal the sick, bind up the injured, bring back the strays, or seek out the lost; but instead you use force to rule them with injustice. Without a shepherd, my flock was scattered; and when it was scattered, it became food for all the wild animals.” So when Jesus, the “Son of David”—the shepherd who became king—encountered this crowd of people at the end of their collective rope, I suspect he had an Ezekiel 34 moment. He was obviously heartbroken, but I think he was also outraged. Every framework, every structure, every safety net God had put in place to protect his people; to ensure justice and prosperity and peace; to promote the flourishing of human life—they’d all been compromised.

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