Tag Archives: Jesus

  1. Do you see this woman? (Luke 7.36-50) [Sermon 2-19-2017]

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    February 17, 2017 by jmar198013

    Jesus wants Simon—and everyone else—to “see this woman.” Because she’s the proof of the parable he’s just told about the two debtors. “This is why I tell you that her many sins have been forgiven,” Jesus says. “So she has shown great love.” The extravagant love she has poured out on Jesus is a sign that she already knows she’s been forgiven. God has released her and welcomed her home. All she’s doing is showing her deep love for the one who unleashed that forgiveness into her life.

  2. Jesus and John (Luke 7.18-35) [Sermon 2-12-17]

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    February 10, 2017 by jmar198013

    John came calling the people to cry, and he was right. Jesus came calling the people to dance, and he was right, too. The Pharisees and scribes thought John was demonic and Jesus was a drunk. And they were wrong. You know what that means? It means there are times and seasons when we need to hear a call like John’s to weep over our sins and repent. But Jesus also calls us to joyful celebration, to acknowledge God’s justice, and feast on God’s love.

    Children of wisdom will know when it’s time to cry, and when it’s time to dance.

  3. The King is coming, bringing joy (Isaiah 61) [Sermon 12-11-2016, Advent 3 2016]

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    December 9, 2016 by jmar198013

    The prophet Isaiah pointed back toward the Jubilee to inspire joy in the remnant of Israel in the present, and hope for their future. During the season of Advent, the church does something similar. We remember that the Messiah of Israel, God’s anointed king Jesus, came into the world bringing joy.

  4. When God repented (Exodus 32.1-14; Luke 23.34) [Sermon 10-09-2016]

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    October 7, 2016 by jmar198013

    Ps 15.4 blesses the person “who keeps their promise even when it hurts.” In our story today, we saw God keep his promises, even though it hurt him. Moses reminded God of the promises he’d made to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. And because God is a faithful God, he kept his promises to them. So God didn’t give up on Israel—even when they broke his heart, and he really wanted to.

    And he still hasn’t given up. Not on humanity. Not on his creation. He’s still the God who is faithful, even when it hurts. He proved that once and for all when an angry mob freaked out and committed an even graver sin than worshiping before a golden calf. As they nailed God’s Son Jesus to a cross, Jesus pleaded: “Father, forgive them, for they don’t know what they’re doing.”

    So God did just that; he forgave.

    And he hasn’t stopped forgiving.

  5. Dreams and schemes (Gen. 37.3-8, 17b-22, 26-34; 50.15-21; Luke 6.35) [sermon 09-25-2016]

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    September 22, 2016 by jmar198013

    Joseph had big dreams. His brothers had twisted schemes. But God had dreams and schemes of his own.

  6. God’s faithfulness, and Abram’s (Gen. 15.1-6) [Sermon 09-18-2016]

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    September 16, 2016 by jmar198013

    Whenever the faithful question or protest or demand answers from God, they are actually demonstrating great faith. They’re calling on God to be faithful to his own word. To be the God they already know he is: truthful, loving, just, and merciful. That’s what Abram was doing in our lesson today.

  7. Don’t lead us into temptation (Luke 11.4c) [Sermon 09-04-2016]

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    September 1, 2016 by jmar198013

    One of the passages Jesus drew upon when the devil tempted him was Deut. 6.16: “Don’t test the LORD your God the way you frustrated him at Massah.” This refers back to an event that happened in Exodus 17. The people came to a place where there was no water, and were afraid God had left them to die of thirst. They lost faith in God, and were about ready to kill Moses. Testing God means refusing to trust that our Father is good and generous and just, and at work in our lives and in his world. It means giving up on God and going our own way. If Jesus had succumbed to any of the devil’s temptations: turned the stones to bread; enforced his will through political means; or stunned people into submission with self-promoting miracles; if Jesus had done any of those things, he would have been testing God. Because that’s not the way God had made for him. God gave Jesus the way of suffering with people and serving them. Not the way of self-promotion and self-service. Jesus still had to go through the Exodus of death and resurrection. To lead us all through the Red Sea of his blood to set us free, and bring us to the home God has promised us.

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