Tag Archives: Acts 2

  1. Baptism: a story as old as heaven and earth (Acts 2.37-42) [sermon 8-13-2017]

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    August 8, 2017 by jmar198013

    In Acts 2.38, Peter told the assembly: “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ so that your sins may be forgiven; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” When 3000 came forward to be baptized, they were plunged into an old, old story that promised a new beginning. Baptism tells a story as old as the heavens and the earth. And it’s a story that will be re-told in the new heavens and new earth.

  2. The gift(s) of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2.1-4; Galatians 4.1-7, 5.16-26; Luke 11.11-13) [Pentecost sermon 2017]

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    May 31, 2017 by jmar198013

    In Acts 2, Peter told those who were baptized at Pentecost they would “receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” We see that this gift didn’t show up primarily in the form of speaking in tongues and other flashy miracles, but in the Spirit creating a family out of a bunch of strangers.

  3. Real talk on generosity (2 Corinthians 8.1-15) [Sermon 06-26-2016]

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    June 22, 2016 by jmar198013

    There’s a feedback loop between fellowship and generosity. That’s how the Jesus model of generosity works. And that’s what Paul hoped the Judean Poor Relief Fund would accomplish: bonding the Jewish and Gentile churches together as a family. A big, diverse, messy, rich, robust family that shows the world how generous God is.

    When we follow the Jesus model of generosity—the self-giving way, the way of sharing-as-fellowship—it changes us. It transforms our hearts, our worldview, our values. We discover that our most valuable treasures are found in each other. And, like the man said: “Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”

  4. Pentecost: Out of the shadow of Babel (Genesis 11.1-9; Acts 2.1-21; Romans 8.14-17) [Sermon 05-15-2016, Pentecost 2016)

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    May 13, 2016 by jmar198013

    The church is God’s alternative to what we see in a world that lives in the shadow of Babel. A world where people mistrust and fear each other for their differences. A world that routinely disintegrates into fiery conflicts and violence and wars. The church lives in the world as God’s new creation, God’s new humanity. Gathered together by the Holy Spirit in Christ, where “there is neither Jew nor Greek; there is neither slave nor free; nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Gal. 3.28). Although we have been scattered in the world by race and color and gender and language and culture and social status, at Pentecost God began to gather us all into a new family. A family where we learn that our differences don’t have to tear us apart, but can be a source of strength. We all have so much to learn from each other. As God calls us into his family, this new creation, we each bring our particular stories; experiences; ideas; dreams; hurts; hangups; traditions; and perspectives with us. We are never called to leave those at the door when we are adopted into God’s new family. We are called to live and move and work together in Christ; to “accept one another” as Christ accepted us (Rom. 15.17); and “to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace” (Eph. 4.3).

  5. In praise of the paradox: A Lord’s Supper Homily on Acts 2.22-24,36

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    January 15, 2013 by jmar198013

    I presented this talk this past Sunday, 1.13.13. It’s mostly inspired by S. Mark Heim’s book Saved From Sacrifice: a Theology of the Cross, Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2006. Heim’s basic premise involves a paradox at the heart of the Gospel: “Christ’s death saves the world, and it ought not to happen.”

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