Category Archives: prophets

  1. Good fences make good neighbors? (Luke 16.19-31) [sermon 3-26-2017]

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    March 24, 2017 by jmar198013

    The rich man—who was used to getting his way—wouldn’t let up. “No, Father Abraham!” he argued. “But if someone from the dead goes to them, they will change their hearts and lives.” Abraham said, “If they don’t listen to Moses and the Prophets, then neither will they be persuaded if someone rises from the dead.” And that gives the story a new twist. Because we know Jesus, the one telling the story, would himself rise from the dead later. But even that wouldn’t convince a lot of people. When you invest yourself in getting more stuff, gaining more status, and winning at any cost—like the Pharisees—you become blind to many things.

  2. Jesus and John (Luke 7.18-35) [Sermon 2-12-17]

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    February 10, 2017 by jmar198013

    John came calling the people to cry, and he was right. Jesus came calling the people to dance, and he was right, too. The Pharisees and scribes thought John was demonic and Jesus was a drunk. And they were wrong. You know what that means? It means there are times and seasons when we need to hear a call like John’s to weep over our sins and repent. But Jesus also calls us to joyful celebration, to acknowledge God’s justice, and feast on God’s love.

    Children of wisdom will know when it’s time to cry, and when it’s time to dance.

  3. An agenda for ministry (Luke 4.14-30) [Sermon 01-15-2017]

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    January 13, 2017 by jmar198013

    Jesus told his neighbors, in no uncertain terms, that God didn’t intend for Jubilee to be proclaimed only to them. Jesus had come to preach the Good News of God’s salvation to all the poor folk. To heal all the blind folk. To proclaim forgiveness and release to all the captives. Yes, even the tax collectors and Samaritans and … even the Romans. God had sent him to proclaim Jubilee to everyone. Even their enemies. And that’s what got them mad enough to throw Jesus off a cliff. Because there’s this human tendency to think blessing is a zero-sum game. Good news for somebody has to mean bad news for somebody else. There can’t be a “year of the Lord’s favor” without a corresponding “day of vengeance for our God.” Jesus came to show us it doesn’t really have to be that way.

  4. The King is coming, bringing hope (Joel 2.12-13, 28-29) [Sermon 12-4-2016, Advent Year 3]

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    December 3, 2016 by jmar198013

    Joel’s prophecy begins with terror–fields and vineyards stripped bare by locusts, and the threat of the Day of the LORD, when God will come to shake things up. But it ends with hope–not only will God restore what the locusts took, but he promises a day of hope for all flesh, and all creation, when all will be restored. The season of Advent likewise points us back to a dark time, when a poor man and woman lay their vulnerable firstborn son in a feeding trough. But that child was God’s visitation, bringing hope to all peoples and all creation. Thus is hope born in us, and through us, the world.

  5. “I’m here; send me!” (Isaiah 6.1-8) [Sermon 11-13-2016]

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    November 10, 2016 by jmar198013

    Like Isaiah, we live in unsettled and unsettling times. Things are changing, which is a constant in our world. But so many feel left behind. Lost. Unheard. Many are afraid of what the future holds for them, if anything. Many live in despair. In fear. In rage. In confusion. We also live in a time when so many unclean lips go unchecked, and the words they speak do real harm. We are surrounded by the walking wounded. In such a time, may we be people with clean lips. God needs us to be his lips, to speak words of hope, comfort, and healing to our wounded neighbors. To use our words to build others up, not tear them down.

    God’s invitation extends to us, from Isaiah’s day to our own: “Whom should I send, and who will go for us?”

    May you and I—all of us—respond as Isaiah did: “I’m here; send me.”

  6. In the midst of death, God brings life (1 Kings 17.1-24) [Sermon 10-30-2016]

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    October 29, 2016 by jmar198013

    In a time of drought and famine, God provided Elijah a brook to drink from, and ordered ravens to feed him. When the brook dried up, God sent him to stay with a widow in enemy territory, and God fed his prophet, the widow, and her son through the duration of the drought. When the widow’s son got sick and died, God raised him. These stories lead us to the heart of God’s character, and to the heart of the Gospel: even in the midst of death, God is the giver of life.

  7. Two parades (Luke 19.28-40) [Sermon 03-20-2016, Palm Sunday Year C]

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    March 19, 2016 by jmar198013

    During Passover in Jesus’ day, the Roman governor Pilate would enter Jerusalem, leading a battalion or two of Roman security forces. On war horses. It was a mighty display of shock and awe. Peace through strength.

    But Luke didn’t even bother mentioning Pilate’s Passover parade in his Gospel. Everyone already knew about that.

    Instead, Luke made sure to tell about the time Jesus led a bootleg Passover parade through the other side of the city. He rode in on a (borrowed) donkey. His parade consisted of rowdy disciples singing off-key hymns (and butchering the words); and throwing their garments on the ground.

    Two parades going on at opposite sides of the same town. At roughly the same time. And the two parades tell two different stories about peace, and what a peaceable kingdom looks like.

    We must all choose to join one of those parades. You can’t be in both, because they’re on opposite ends of town.

    Which parade will you be in?

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chronicles

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