Category Archives: Lord’s Supper

  1. Opening the scriptures (Luke 24.13-35) [sermon 4-23-2017]

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    April 22, 2017 by jmar198013

    Jesus still journeys with his church, just as he did those two disciples on the way from Jerusalem to Emmaus. And every time we take and bless and break and share the bread that is his body and the wine that is his blood, the crucified and resurrected Jesus is our host. He is made known to us. We can join with the disciples who first proclaimed: The Lord has risen indeed! And we can know that because he has been raised from the dead, so will we.

  2. Passover: taste the faithfulness (Exodus 12.1-13; 13.1-8; Luke 22.14-20) [sermon 10-02-2016]

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    September 30, 2016 by jmar198013

    The Psalmist invites us to, “taste and see how good the LORD is!” (Ps 34.8). When the Israelites ate the Passover meal every year, they did just that. And when Christians share the Lord’s Supper each week, so do we.

  3. Feed us and forgive us (Luke 11.3-4) [Sermon 08-28-2016]

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    August 25, 2016 by jmar198013

    Jesus taught us to pray for our bread; and to pray that we will be forgiving as well as forgiven people. But he also gave us a meal—one we share every week—that binds the story of our forgiveness to the bread we eat.

  4. Real talk on the new creation (2 Corinthians 5.11-21) [Sermon 06-19-2016]

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    June 17, 2016 by jmar198013

    To say that the life, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus is good news because it means that there is a new creation. And this new creation is possible because the fallen creation died with Christ; and when he rose, he brought a new creation with him. And in this new creation, everyone and everything is reconciled to God. This is a very big, very good gospel.

    I want to celebrate this very big, very good news. I want us to celebrate the gospel—this gospel—together. But I suspect that some of you might be sniffing around this very good gospel for horse manure. And that’s okay. Some days, I do, too. So if any of you are thinking, “Preacher, either Paul was full of it; or you are; or both of you are”; I get it. That’s totally understandable.

    When we look around our world, everything doesn’t look reconciled, does it? When we examine our lives, everything doesn’t feel reconciled, does it?

    Some preachers will just tell you not to trust what your eyes can plainly see; what you have learned from experience; or what your heart already knows. But there is a very real tension between what Paul has told us, and what we see and feel and experience every day. It would be dishonest of me; or of you; or anyone, to deny that this tension exists.

  5. Real talk on forgiveness (2 Corinthians 2.1-10; Matthew 18.21-22) [Sermon 05-29-2016]

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    May 27, 2016 by jmar198013

    The church just isn’t the church without forgiveness. After all, we Christians understand ourselves first of all (or at least we should) as people who need to be—and have been—forgiven by God. But then what does forgiveness mean? Does it mean, for instance, that once an apology has been offered and accepted, everything goes back to how it was before? Is forgiveness a reset button? Must we forget what we have forgiven? Or do victims get a say in setting future boundaries? Are there conditions that need to be met in order for forgiveness to take place? If we insist that victims extend unconditional forgiveness, isn’t that grace for the offender, and law for the victim?

  6. Epilogue (John 21.1-19) [Sermon 04-10-2016, Easter 3c]

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    April 8, 2016 by jmar198013

    In the Epilogue to John’s Gospel, the risen Jesus makes the word forgiveness become flesh for his estranged disciple Peter. The good news is, it isn’t just a story about Peter being reconciled to Jesus. It’s a story for each one of us, too.

  7. The Prodigal Father (Luke 15.11-32)

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    May 10, 2015 by jmar198013

    The truth of the parable of Luke 15 (which is more about a father’s reckless love than it is about a son’s rebellious wandering) is embodied whenever we gather for the Lord’s Supper: at the table where we all—Prodigal Sons and elder brothers alike—find ourselves welcomed and accepted.

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